Eating places wrestle to get again to full-staff

0
546

More than a week after Massachusetts lifted all COVID-19 corporate restrictions, signs for help are wanted everywhere. The owner of Darryl’s Corner Bar and Kitchen on Columbus Avenue in Boston said that while the restaurant is allowed to open to full capacity, it does not have enough staff. The staff is not big enough to allow the restaurant to fully open up the outdoor and indoor areas. “We still have limited hours, but we can’t extend our hours yet. We can’t necessarily extend our days. We used to be open six days a week, now we have five,” said Nia Grace, owner of Darryl’s. Located in The Westland, near Symphony Hall, the restaurant is preparing to reopen for the first time since March 2020 with almost entirely new staff. Some of the former employees have found a new job, have moved away or are staying at home due to unemployment. College students are also no longer taking part-time jobs like they used to, restaurateurs said. “Before the pandemic, we were open for seven days and seven nights. As of now, we’re only open five nights for this reopening next week, ”said Doug Bacon of the Red Paint Hospitality Group. To lure employees back, restaurants say they offer higher wages and flexible hours – if possible. They also hope things will improve and look forward to the fall when the extra unemployment benefits run out and more students return to the area.

More than a week after Massachusetts lifted all COVID-19 corporate restrictions, signs for help are wanted everywhere.

The owner of Darryl’s Corner Bar and Kitchen on Columbus Avenue in Boston said that while the restaurant is allowed to open to full capacity, it does not have enough staff. The staff is not big enough to allow the restaurant to fully open up the outdoor and indoor areas.

“We still have limited hours, but we can’t extend our hours yet. We can’t necessarily extend our days. We used to be open six days a week, now we have five,” said Nia Grace, owner of Darryl’s.

Located in The Westland, near Symphony Hall, the restaurant is preparing to reopen for the first time since March 2020 with almost entirely new staff.

Some of the former employees have found a new job, have moved away or are staying at home due to unemployment. College students are also no longer taking part-time jobs like they used to, restaurateurs said.

“Before the pandemic, we were open for seven days and seven nights. As of now, we’re only open five nights for this reopening next week, ”said Doug Bacon of the Red Paint Hospitality Group.

To lure employees back, restaurants say they offer higher wages and flexible hours – if possible.

They also hope things will improve and look forward to the fall when the extra unemployment benefits run out and more students return to the area.